What A Home Inspector Looks For?

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What will fail a home inspection?

Top reasons home inspections fail

Electrical problems: The most common electrical issues include wiring that’s not up to code, frayed wiring, or improperly wired electrical panels. Plumbing issues: Leaky pipes (and resulting water damage), failing water heaters, and sewer system problems are some of the most expensive.

What should I expect at a home inspection?

The inspector will check that major appliances are functional, scrutinize the heating and air-conditioning system, examine the plumbing and electrical systems and may even poke around in the attic and basement. The goal of a home inspection is to uncover issues with the home itself.

How do you pass a home inspection?

13 Home Inspection Tips for Sellers

  • Be Honest with Inspector. First off, the home inspector should ask if there are any major issues with the home.
  • Check Roof and Foundation.
  • Check Drainage.
  • Remove Clutter Around the Home.
  • Make Sure Floors are Even.
  • Monitor the Exterior.
  • Check Electricity.
  • Provide Documentation for Repairs & Maintenance.

What should I be worried about a home inspection?

Some of the major home inspection items worth addressing are:

  1. Termites or other wood destroying insects.
  2. Wildlife infestation like bats or squirrels in the attic.
  3. Major drainage or on going water problems.
  4. Mold problems.
  5. Elevated Radon levels above EPA suggested levels.
  6. Major electrical defects that cause safety issues.

Do they check for mold in a home inspection?

Ask your home inspector.

While it’s not the inspector’s job to look for mold, most home inspectors will mention obvious signs of water damage and the possible presence of mold. Some inspectors may be wary of this, because they want to avoid liability for any mold-related problems.

Is there a lemon law for houses?

Many states have so-called lemon laws that protect consumers who buy a brand-new car that turns out to be defective. But no lemon law protects homebuyers. Sellers usually are required by state law to disclose, though not necessarily repair, material defects. Builders typically offer warranties for brand-new houses.