Quick Answer: How Do Sellers Negotiate After Home Inspection?

Your Options After a Home Inspection

  • Ask the seller to make the repairs themselves.
  • Ask for credits toward your closing costs.
  • Ask the seller to reduce the sales price to make up for the repairs.
  • Back out of the transaction (if you have an inspection contingency in place)
  • Move forward with the deal.

Does seller have to make repairs after inspection?

Home inspection repairs that aren’t required

Cosmetic issues and normal wear and tear that’s found by the inspector usually don’t have to be fixed. Furthermore, “state laws may also impact your liability as a seller for any issues uncovered during an inspection.”

What is reasonable to ask for after home inspection?

Request repairs: The buyer may request that the seller complete a list of requested repairs, as a condition of the sale moving forward. Ask for a credit: The buyer may request a credit (also called a concession), in an amount that’s enough to cover the repairs.

How long after a home inspection does the buyer have to back out?

seven days

How long do sellers have to make repairs?

Sellers typically get a week or two to hire contractors or do the work on his/her own, depending on how the buyer and his/her broker wrote the request for repairs. They agree to complete the negotiated repairs no less than three days from the closing date.

What happens if Seller fails to repairs?

In short, if an Amendment to the contract regarding repairs has been executed then it is part of the contract. If the Seller does not follow through with repairs on an Amendment to the contract in the timeline specified in the Amendment, then the Seller would be in Default.

How can I get seller to pay for repairs?

Instead of asking for a discount, you can simply ask the seller to pay for the repairs. This can either take the form of having the work done before you actually buy the house, or having the seller put the repair money into escrow so you can pay for the work after the sale goes through.

What should I be worried about a home inspection?

Some of the major home inspection items worth addressing are:

  1. Termites or other wood destroying insects.
  2. Wildlife infestation like bats or squirrels in the attic.
  3. Major drainage or on going water problems.
  4. Mold problems.
  5. Elevated Radon levels above EPA suggested levels.
  6. Major electrical defects that cause safety issues.

Are sellers liable after closing?

To hold a seller responsible for repairs after the closing, a buyer must prove that the seller withheld material facts about the home’s condition. A seller is unlikely to be held liable for repairs after the close of escrow if the seller disclosed all known defects to the buyer.

Can you negotiate repairs after home inspection?

Most buyers do end up needing to negotiate repairs after a home inspection, but look at it as a good thing—it’s much better to have the seller handle necessary repairs than be on the line for them once the home is in your name.

What happens when home inspection fails?

A home inspection is an integral part of the house-purchasing process. Buyers are able to withdraw their offer if they don’t like the findings. If the house inspector discovers a leak in the plumbing that resulted in mold growth, numerous purchasers might want to bail even if the seller fixed the issue.

Do buyers back out after inspection?

Most of the time, the purchase contract will allow you an “out” if, after completing your home inspection, you decide the house just isn’t right for you. If you are past the inspection deadline, though, it is possible that your earnest money may not be refundable.