How Do I Sell My House To A Family Member?

Selling a House to a Family Member: the 4 Things You Need to Know

  • Agree on a price, but stay flexible. In a standard real estate transaction, the buyer and seller are on opposing teams.
  • Selling your home to family below market value can get tricky.
  • Stay on the IRS’ good side.
  • Swap your realtor for a lawyer.

Is it illegal to sell your house to a family member?

It is only illegal to sell your home to relative if you’re doing so to avoid taxes — and doing that illegally. Plus, if you’re selling for an extreme discount, you may be subject to an estate and gift tax, anyway. Otherwise, selling a home to a family member is just like selling your home to any other buyer.

Do I need a realtor to sell my house to a family member?

In other words, if you sell your home to a family member for less than the fair market value, it’s a gift. The IRS allows anyone to give up to $14,000 per year to any number of people without having to pay gift taxes.

Can I sell my house to a relative for $1?

The short answer is yes. You can sell property to anyone you like at any price if you own it. The Internal Revenue Service takes the position that you’re making a $199,999 gift if you sell for $1 and the home’s fair market value is $200,000, even if you sell to your child.

How do I transfer property to a family member quickly and effectively?

To transfer property smoothly and successfully, follow these steps:

  1. Discuss the terms of the deed with the new owners.
  2. Hire a real estate attorney to prepare the deed.
  3. Review the deed.
  4. Sign the deed in front of a notary public, with witnesses present.
  5. File the deed on public record.

What is considered an arm’s length transaction?

An arm’s length transaction refers to a business deal in which buyers and sellers act independently without one party influencing the other.

How do I transfer a deed to a family member?

To transfer a house deed to a family member right now, obtain a quit form deed. Get the required form from the recorder or register of deeds in the county where your house is located, then fill it out, sign it in front of a notary, and send it to your family member.