Quick Answer: Can You Sue Your House Inspector?

Can a seller sue a home inspector?

Lawsuits happen, but they don’t always end badly for home inspectors.

In those cases, it’s more often the buyer who attempts to sue the inspector for allegedly overlooking a problem.

But sometimes a seller can sue an inspector.

It’s not common, but it does happen.

What are home inspectors liable for?

Liability. The real estate home inspector is liable if he misses any problems, whether major or minor, with any of the items on his checklist. Some might be minor, like a leaky faucet, that a buyer would overlook and not pursue. The inspector’s mistake will cause the buyer to have to purchase a new furnace.

How do I file a complaint against a home inspector?

The phone number is 847-954-3185 and the fax number is 847-759-1620. The website is homeinspector.org. Since professional home inspectors are generally licensed by the state in which they operate, homeowners can file a complaint about bad behavior with their state’s department of professional regulation.

Do home inspectors have to get up on the roof?

Roof. Home inspectors will gamely climb onto your roof and check for missing or warped shingles and make sure flashing and gutters are in good shape. You can hire a specialized roof inspector for $500 to $750 to examine roofs that a regular inspector will avoid.

Can home inspector be liable?

Liability. The real estate home inspector is liable if he misses any problems, whether major or minor, with any of the items on his checklist. Some might be minor, like a leaky faucet, that a buyer would overlook and not pursue. The inspector’s mistake will cause the buyer to have to purchase a new furnace.

Are there lemon laws for houses?

But no lemon law protects homebuyers. Sellers usually are required by state law to disclose, though not necessarily repair, material defects. Builders typically offer warranties for brand-new houses. Home warranty policies can be bought for resale houses as well.