Can Seller Make Repairs After Closing?

Repairs to be made after closing can happen in one of several ways: The seller gives the buyer a lump sum at closing to cover the cost of repairs, which the buyer agrees to carry out.

The seller prepays a contractor to do the work.

The amount is usually computed at 1.5 times the estimated cost.

Can repairs be done after closing?

Repairs can be made before or after closing but if the seller makes the repairs before closing, the buyer should take the home inspector back for a recheck as soon as possible. However, there are some scenarios where repairs can be made after closing.

Are sellers liable after closing?

To hold a seller responsible for repairs after the closing, a buyer must prove that the seller withheld material facts about the home’s condition. A seller is unlikely to be held liable for repairs after the close of escrow if the seller disclosed all known defects to the buyer.

What can go wrong after closing?

One of the most common closing problems is an error in documents. It could be as simple as a misspelled name or transposed address number or as serious as an incorrect loan amount or missing pages. Either way, it could cause a delay of hours or even days.

What happens if seller does not make repairs before closing?

If the seller didn’t do repairs, yes you can refuse to close. You also need to look at what you lose if you don’t close. If you actually don’t close, you lose all your inspection money, appraisal money, and any money you put into the transaction.

Do sellers have to make repairs?

If the Seller Refuses

Even if your requests are reasonable, the sellers may still reject your addendum. In most cases, the sellers have no obligation to fix anything. It’s possible that the seller won’t make repairs after the inspection and refuse to offer credit.

What happens if seller does not make repairs?

It states: if an inspector has to return for a re-inspect because the seller did not repair or replace the damage as per the agreement, the seller will be responsible for the re-inspection fee. Having this addendum in the original contract incentivizes the seller to get the repairs right the first time.